Donald Estep

University Interdisciplinary Research Scholar

Professor of Statistics

SIAM Fellow

Chalmers University Jubilee Professor 2013-14

Associate Chair for Graduate Studies

Director, Center for Interdisciplinary Mathematics and Statistics

Welcome!

 

I am a professor in the Department of Statistics at Colorado State University. I joined CSU in 2000 as a professor in Mathematics. I moved to Statistics bit by bit over the years, finally joining the department full time 2014. Before coming to CSU, I was a professor in the School of Mathematics at Georgia Tech for 13 years. I have also spent significant amounts of time at Chalmers University of Technology in Göteborg, Sweden and Caltech.

 

My research lies in the broad area of uncertainty quantification for differential equations modeling physical, biological, and engineering systems. This includes derivation and implementation of accurate error estimates for numerical solutions of complex models, efficient numerical methods for stochastic forward sensitivity, and formulation and solution of stochastic inverse problems for parameter determination. I am motivated by problems that arise in various application fields, including ecology, materials science, detection of black holes, design of fusion reactors, analysis of nuclear fuels, hurricane wave forecasting, flow in porous media, and communication networks. I have extensive interdisciplinary interactions with engineers and scientists in a number of government laboratories as well as several companies.

 

I have taught many kinds of mathematics courses at many levels over the years. More recently, I have enjoyed teaching in Statistics very much. I have written several textbooks that reflect my ideas about learning. I am generally interested in learning and teaching, and have devised training and review programs for teaching for both graduate students and faculty.

 

In these pages, you will find information about my research and educational activities.

Far better an approximate answer to the right question, which is often vague, than the exact answer to the wrong question, which can always be made precise. - John Tukey

Last Updated 6/2016

External Links

Colorado State University

Department of Statistics

SIAM/ASA

J. U. Q.

DiaMonD

Troy Butler

U. C. Denver

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CIMS

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