as of now, i will put snidbits of code that have helped me as of late

 

how i feel

R is great... are there any faults??

one of the most beautiful texts ever written

example of bitwise operators in C and C++

how do i put two figures side by side in LaTeX

how do i put an at sign on my webpage

evil c++ code

how to create a pound sign in LaTeX

type in script font in LaTeX

 

 

here are some words of wisdom

i think studying mathematics provides this

Tomorrow's illiterate will not be the man who can't read; he will be the man who has not learned how to learn.

The new education must teach the individual how to classify and reclassify information, how to evaluate its veracity, how to change categories when necessary, how to move from the concrete to the abstract and back, how to look at problems from a new direction -- how to teach himself.

-Herbert Gerjuoy

Is there anything fundamentally wrong with R?

provided by Prof. Dijkstra

Oh yeah, there is!

This is just one of the things that I ALWAYS find annoying and just miserable: when I can't subtract the length of an array to get it's first element. Do you really iterate to N+1 !?!?! This document is a short -yet poignant- explanation of why it's wrong, and why it should be fixed in a future iteration of the language.

-Edgar E. Dijkstra

here is a fantastic, short. text

i pee myself a little every time i read this

If you were born before 1990, you will remember the year 2000 "scare," along with its, parallel, computer crash scare. Here is a response from a software engineer, Stanley Rabinowitz, to a report that his code incorrectly assumed that the year 2000 was a leap year.

an example of bitwise operators

implemented in C and C++

If you click on

  • this link
  • ,
    it will take you to an example of bit level operations in programming.

    a very classic example: Exclusive-OR encryption!

    how do you put two figures side by side in LaTeX?

    here are two easy ways

    The first way, which I seem to mostly use is by using what's called a minipage. You will need to place: \usepackage{graphicx} at the top of your file.

    \begin{figure}[ht]
    \begin{minipage}[b]{0.45\linewidth}
    \centering
    \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{filename1}
    \caption{default}
    \label{fig:figure1}
    \end{minipage}
    \hspace{0.5cm}
    \begin{minipage}[b]{0.45\linewidth}
    \centering
    \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{filename2}
    \caption{default}
    \label{fig:figure2}
    \end{minipage}
    \end{figure}

    The second way is by using a package called subfigure.

    At the top of your file, place the following code: \usepackage{subfigure}.

    \begin{figure}
    \centering
    \mbox{\subfigure{\includegraphics[width=3in]{fig1.pdf}}
    \quad
    \subfigure{\includegraphics[width=3in]{fig2.pdf} }}}
    \caption{Text pertaining to both graphs ...} 
    \label{fig12}
    \end{figure}

    If you want to have two different captions use the following code:

    \mbox{\subfigure[Caption for Subfig1]{\includegraphics[width=3in]
        {contextmodel}}\quad
    \subfigure[Caption for Subfig2]{\includegraphics[width=3.5in]
    {contextmodel2}}}

     

    how do you write the html code so that i can place an "at sign" on my site?

    here are two easy ways

    The first way is the most flexible. You simply wrap the symbol that you want to use, in this case the at sign, @, with the following: code and /code (you must put the arrow brackets around these words as well, of course, as all html code). Note: many people will also wrap things in this tag to simply highlight a word.

    Another way is to use: pre and /pre, which refers to preformatted text.

    here is a snid bit of evil c++ code

    can you figure out what the output is??

    int main() {
        string a="hello", b=a;
        char *p = (char *) a.data();
        *p = 'm';
        cout << a << ' ' << b << endl;
        return 0;
    }

    how to create a pound sign in LaTeX

    this is fairly universal for other symbols, as well

    If you want to place a pound sign, #, in your LaTeX document, you simply have to place a backslash before the symbol: \#.

    If you are trying to place the currency symbol, (£), in your document, then you simply type \pounds.

    typesetting script font in LaTeX

    i find these to be very useful

    If you want to use script fonts in LaTeX, it is quite simple and very useful.

    Just take a look at this document.

    Mathematical symbols in LaTeX

    i find these to be very useful... math symbols

    If you want to use math symbols in LaTeX, it is quite simple and, if you're using LaTeX, very useful.

    Just take a look at this Mathematical Symbols document.

    This is the end to end all document on Math Symbols in LaTeX.

    This is my "intellectual" property.

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